CORONAVIRUS DISEASE 2019 (COVID-19)

Overview                                      Federal Updates/Alerts
How Can I Protect Myself?  

CDC Resources

DPH State Updates/Alerts  

CDC HAN Alerts

Healthcare Practitioner Resources       

CDC Fact Sheets

Public Health Practitioner Resources   U.S. Department of Health & Human Services
School Resources    World Health Organization
Behavioral Health Resources   U.S. Department of Labor
Media/News Releases    

CORONAVIRUS DISEASE 2019 (COVID-19) OVERVIEW

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is closely monitoring an outbreak of respiratory disease caused by a novel (new) coronavirus that was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China and which continues to expand. On February 11, 2020, the World Health Organization named the disease coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated COVID-19. COVID-19 illnesses, most of them associated with travel from Wuhan, also are being reported in a growing number of international locations, including the United States. Imported cases of COVID-19 in travelers have been detected in the U.S. Person-to-person spread of COVID-19 also has been seen among close contracts of returned travelers from Wuhan, but at this time, this virus is NOT currently spreading in the community in the United States. There are no confirmed cases in Connecticut at this time.

In Connecticut and throughout the world, influenza (flu) activity is high. Unless you have traveled to or from Wuhan, China, or been in close contact with a confirmed infected person for a prolonged period of time, it is likely that symptoms you experience are caused by the flu. The CDC encourages all people aged 6 months and older to be vaccinated. It is not too late to get vaccinated for the flu. Check with your healthcare provider, call your local health department, or visit the HealthMap Vaccine Finder (adults) for availability of flu vaccinations.

 

HOW CAN I PROTECT MYSELF?

There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19 infection. Person-to-person spread of the virus is thought to occur mainly via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Much is still unknown about how the virus spreads. Take these everyday preventative actions to help stop the spread of germs.

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then through the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

DPH STATE UPDATES/ALERTS

HEALTHCARE PRACTITIONER RESOURCES

PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTITIONER RESOURCES

SCHOOL RESOURCES  

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH RESOURCES

MEDIA/NEWS RELEASES

FEDERAL UPDATES/ALERTS

CDC Resources

U.S. Department of Health &Human Services (HHS):

World Health Organization (WHO):

United States Department of Labor