Beginning Nov. 20, 2023, every U.S. household can again place an order to receive four more free COVID-19 rapid tests delivered to their home by visiting COVIDTests.gov. If you did not order tests this fall, you may place two orders for a total of eight tests. Additionally, before you discard any “expired” test kits you have, please check here to see if the expiration dates of your COVID-19 tests have been extended.

Tularemia

Dog Tick and Lone Star Tick

 

Tularemia is a rare disease caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. It can be spread to people through the bite of an infected American Dog Tick (Dermacentor variabilis) or Lone Star tick (Amblyomma americanum), the bite of an infected deer fly, or contact with tissues of an infected animal. Treatment is available and is dependent on the signs and symptoms. There are several forms of infection. The most common form causes a skin ulcer at the site where bacteria entered the body. Tularemia is on the list of potential bioterrorism pathogens. The best way to prevent tularemia is to prevent tick bites.

 

About Tularemia

 

Information for Clinicians

 

Clinical Guidance (CDC)

 

National Surveillance Case Definitions

 

Connecticut Provider Reporting Information – Category 1 disease, call DPH to report

 

Connecticut Laboratory Reporting Information

 

 

Directory of Clinical Testing Services provided by the State Public Health Laboratory

State Public Health Laboratory Contacts – for additional information

 

Tick-borne Diseases of the United States – a Reference Manual for Healthcare Providers

 

Connecticut Tularemia Surveillance

  

The Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) added Tularemia to the list of state-wide reportable Category 1 diseases in 1999. Diseases classified as Category 1 are reportable immediately by phone on the day of recognition or strong suspicion of disease. Tularemia is on the reportable list of possible bioterrorism agents. There have been no reported cases of Tularemia in Connecticut since surveillance began.  

Cases of Tularemia reported to the DPH from January 1 – December 31, 2019.

 

0-Zero

 

Connecticut Annual Infectious Diseases Statistics

 

 

 

This page last updated 11/4/2022.