RRP-Certified Contractor Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window                                        Remodeling Your Home Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window              
Property Owner Responsibilities Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window                           Resources Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window
Lead Inspectors Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window                   
Find Licensed Lead Abatement Contractor Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window  

 

RRP-Certified Contractor

What is an RRP-certified contractor?
 
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) created the Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule (RRP Rule) which requires companies performing renovation, repair, and painting projects that disturb lead-based paint in homes, child care facilities and pre-schools built before 1978 to have their company certified by EPA (or an EPA authorized state).


An RRP- certified contractor is someone who completes an EPA-approved training program focused on teaching proper and safe work practices when working with lead-based paint.

 
Click here to find an RRP-certified contractor in your area.

 

For more information, read EPA's guide that describes why you should hire a lead-safe renovator.  

 



Find a Licensed Lead Abatement Contractor

 

Click here to find a licensed lead abatement contractor near you: scroll down the page and click on Lead Consulting and Abatement Professionals > check Lead Abatement Contractors >  scroll down to the bottom of the page > select Continue > click Download

To verify an individual’s credential, such as a lead abatement supervisor or a lead abatement worker, click here

 

When does a property owner have to abate? Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window Opens in a new window



Lead Inspector


What is a lead inspector?

Residential lead inspections are conducted by lead consultants licensed through the Department of Public Health, whom employ lead inspectors or lead inspector/risk assessors. 


Lead inspections are performed:

  • In response to an elevated blood lead level of a child;
  • In response to a child less than 6 years of age residing in a pre-1978 dwelling in which toxic levels of lead and defective surfaces have been previously identified;
  • For housing rehabilitation projects
  • On a voluntary basis to identify locations of toxic levels of lead prior to any renovation or abatement work.
 
Click here to find a lead inspector: scroll down the page and click on Lead Consulting and Abatement Professionals > check Lead Consultants>  scroll down to the bottom of the page > select Continue > click Download

 

Comprehensive Lead Inspection

A comprehensive lead inspection is a surface by surface test conducted using a special instrument to test the amount of lead in paint testing called an X-ray Fluorescence analyzer or XRF analyzer.  The XRF analyzer identifies lead in all layers of paint.  This method of testing is non-destructive.  As part of the comprehensive lead inspection, soil, water, and dust samples are collected and analyzed for lead concentrations by a certified laboratory.

If a full, comprehensive, lead inspection is not required, a more limited testing (e.g., paint testing within the interior of the home or paint testing of areas that are scheduled for repainting or remodeling) may also be conducted by a licensed lead consultant.

 

Risk Assessment

A risk assessment is different than a comprehensive lead inspection because it involves testing painted surfaces that are defective only.

A risk assessment includes an onsite inspection and visual examination of the property to identify potential lead-based paint hazards, such as defective paint, with follow up testing of potential sources of toxic levels of lead.  Defective painted surfaces can be tested by XRF analysis or paint chip analysis by a certified laboratory.  Dust wipe samples may be collected in selected locations to determine if a lead dust hazard exist.  Soil and water samples may be collected and analyzed for lead concentrations.  A lead risk assessment report explains actions that may be taken to address any identified lead hazards identified.  Intact paint is usually not tested during a risk assessment.

 

Required Lead Inspection or Lead Risk Assessment

If you have a lead inspection or lead risk assessment conducted, you must have the work performed by a DPH Licensed Lead Consultant who must employ a DPH certified lead inspector or lead inspector risk assessor to conduct the inspection.   A Home Inspector cannot provide either of these services.

Please refer to the DPH e-Licensing website to obtain a roster of lead consultant contractors (directions on how to find a licensed and certified Lead Professional are below).


Forms:

Model Lead Abatement Plan for Residential Dwellings

Model Lead Management Plan for Residential Dwellings

 

Property Owner Responsibilities

When does a property owner have to abate?

  • When a child under the age of 6 has an elevated blood lead level and resides in a pre-1978 dwelling unit, abatement must take place on the interior, exterior and common areas of the dwelling.
    • This includes all hazardous levels of defective lead-based paint, all lead-based chewable surfaces (whether or not they are defective), all lead-based movable parts of windows and surfaces that rub against movable part of windows, and hazardous levels of lead in bare soil areas

 

Statutes/Regulations Related to Lead Abatement

 

CHAPTER 368a -- Department of Public Health--Public Health and Well-Being.

  • Sec. 19a-111c. Abatement of lead in dwellings. List of encapsulant products. Regulations

CHAPTER 833a -- Public Enforcement of Health and Safety Standards in Tenement and Boarding Houses, and in Rented Dwellings.

  • Sec. 47a-52. (Formerly Sec. 19-88). Abatement of conditions in rented dwelling other than tenement house constituting danger to life or health.
  • Sec. 8-219e. Financial assistance for the abatement of lead-based paint and asbestos. Regulations.
  • 19a-111 Lead Poisoning Prevention and Control Regulations  
 

 

Remodeling Your Home

When renovating houses built before 1978, it is safe to presume that there is lead paint in the interior and exterior of the residence, and therefore it is critical to work with extra precautions so you do not poison yourself, your family, your pets or your neighbors. Please use the resources below to ensure you work in a safe way.

 

Quick Tips

  • Hire an EPA RRP Certified Firm
  • Never dry scrape paint
  • Use a spray bottle to wet all painted surfaces with water before scraping
  • Never sand paint with sand paper or and other sanding device
  • Never power wash to remove paint
  • Use personal protective equipment
  • Use containment and barriers

  



Testing Your Home for Lead

The DPH does not recommend testing a home for lead unless it is required by the local health department due to an elevated blood lead level in a child.  Instead, we recommend that all persons living in a home built before 1978 presume there is lead paint on the interior and exterior of the home and use safe and appropriate work practices during all renovation activities (painting, window replacement, exterior siding installation, etc.). 

 

 

“Lead-Safe” Certification

 If you own a rental dwelling, single family or multi-family, your homeowner’s insurance company may require you to have a lead-safe certificate.  Many homeowners insurance companies confuse the terms lead-safe with lead-free.  The majority of homes in Connecticut were built prior to 1978, therefore, it is likely that many homes have some lead paint components somewhere within the home.  It is best for you to verify with your homeowner’s insurance company, in writing, exactly what they require:  either a lead-safe certificate, which involves a visual inspection, conducted by a licensed lead consultant, or a lead inspector/risk assessment, also conducted by a licensed lead consultant.   Most times a lead-safe certificate is acceptable.  A lead-safe certificate indicates that all potential lead-based painted surfaces are intact at the time of the inspection.  When the potential lead-based painted surfaces are intact, the home is deemed leas-safe, and should be maintained accordingly. 

 


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