The Center for Nanoscale Phosphorus Delivery (CeNaPD)

Background:

This Center of Excellence is the product of a USDA AFRI Foundational Program Grant Award 2021-67021-34001 in the Agriculture Systems and Technology Program Area; specifically: Program Area Priority Code A1511 “Nanotechnology for Agricultural and Food Systems.” The grant title is, "Biodegradable Polymer Nanocomposites for Controlled Release and Targeted Delivery of Phosphorus During Plant Growth." The project dates are January 1, 2021 to December 31, 2023.

 

Center Investigators:
 

Project Director (PD) - Jason C. White, Ph.D. 
Director 
The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES)
123 Huntington Street

New Haven, CT 06511
203-974-8440
Jason.White@ct.gov

 
Co-Project Director (CoPD) - Wade Elmer, Ph.D.
Emeritus Scientist
Department of Plant Pathology and Ecology 
The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES)
123 Huntington Street
New Haven, CT 06511
203-974-8503 
Wade.Elmer@ct.gov

CoPDHoward Fairbrother, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Chemistry
Johns Hopkins University (JHU)
New Chemistry Building 216
3400 N. Charles Street, 
Baltimore, MD 21218
410-516-4328
howardf@jhu.edu 

 

Jaya Borgatta, Ph.D. 

JHU Graduate (Ph.D.) Student

Leslie Sigmon

Department of Chemistry

Johns Hopkins University (JHU)

New Chemistry Building 216

3400 N. Charles Street,

Baltimore, MD 21218

lsigmon2@jhu.edu

 Other Team Members:
 

Christian Dimkpa, Ph.D.

Head and Chief Scientist

Department of Analytical Chemistry

The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station

123 Huntington Street

New Haven, CT 06511

Christian.Dimkpa@ct.gov

 

Dr. Dimkpa’s research within the Department of Analytical Chemistry focuses on the fate and effects of engineered nanomaterials in agricultural plants, and the use of nanoscale nutrients to suppress crop diseases. One of the main themes of our research is on designing ways to minimize agrochemical inputs without sacrificing yield through the use of nanoscale nutrients. For instance, work on phosphorus (P) that is synergistic to the current USDA project involves formulation of P forms with biopolymers such as chitosan and/or the incorporation of micronutrients to regulate P availability to plants as described below.

 

 

 
Ishaq Adisa, Ph.D.

Post-doctoral Scientist

Department of Analytical Chemistry

The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station

123 Huntington Street

New Haven, CT 06511

Ishaq.Adisa@ct.gov

 
Mr. Craig Musante

Assistant Scientist I

Department of Analytical Chemistry

The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station

123 Huntington Street

New Haven, CT 06511

203-974-8454

Craig.Musante@ct.gov

 
 International Collaborators:
 
Daohui Lin, Ph.D./Prof.
Department of Environmental Science
Zhejiang University
Hangzhou 310058, China
Email: lindaohui@zju.edu.cn
https://person.zju.edu.cn/en/0098366
 

Dr. Daohui Lin is a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, China. He obtained his Ph.D. in environmental science from Zhejiang University in 2005, M.S. in environmental science from Beijing Normal University in 1998, and B.S. in geography from Hangzhou University in 1995. He worked as a visiting scholar (2006-2008) at University of Massachusetts at Amherst. His research area is environmental science, focusing on environmental behavior and ecological effect of contaminants, especially of engineered nanomaterials. He has published about 170 research papers. He is a recipient of the National Natural Science Fund of China for Distinguished Young Scholars and is a project coordinator of the National Key Research and Development Program of China. He currently serves as editorial board members of Science of the Total Environment, Environmental Pollution, and Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety.

 
Prof. Melanie Kah
Science Centre, Building 302.471 23 Symonds Street
The University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland, New Zealand
Email: melanie.kah@auckland.ac.nz
 

My research is focused on the release, fate, effects and remediation of contaminants in the environment. I have worked with the whole spectrum of substances that are released as a result of human activities including pesticides, polymers, PAHs, PFASs, pharmaceuticals, metals and nanoparticles. Projects can involve desk-based, laboratory and field experiments, and aim at generating solid scientific bases to improve the management of our environment. I am particularly interested in elucidating the processes occurring at solid interfaces (e.g. sorption, degradation, uptake by organisms), and understand how they are influenced by environmental factors and the contaminant properties. My recent research on the ecological risk assessment of nanopesticides is a good illustration of the multidisciplinary approach applied in my group over the last years.

 
Helmi Hamdi, Dr. Agr. Eng. Habil
Food-Energy-Waste-Sustainability (FEWS) Program
Center for Sustainable Development
College of Arts and Sciences
Qatar University, Doha, Qatar
Email: hhamdi@qu.edu.qa
Phone: +974 44037574
 

Food-Energy-Waste-Sustainability Program (FEWS) Center for Sustainable Development, Qatar University
The Food-Energy-Waste-Sustainability (FEWS) Program that is constituted of the respective research topics and operates under the auspice of the Center for Sustainable Development (CSD), Qatar University aims at holistically dealing with the technology development and the main environmental issues of Qatar in a sustainable manner, being completely in line with the Qatar's national vision (QNV2030). Currently, the food production sector in Qatar faces major challenges related mainly to adverse pedo-climatic conditions, high production costs, and the generation of huge amounts of wastes. Under the current conjuncture, any increase in food production will inevitably deepen the unsustainable management of the available resources and will negatively affect the future development of Qatar’s economy. In this regard, the multidisciplinary team of the FEWS program proposes advanced technological solutions to increase food production in Qatar while preserving the limited/non-renewable resources and the environment. For instance, the use of adapted crop species, treated wastewater, non-conventional agricultural inputs, and novel technologies could decrease production costs in Qatar while ensuring a stable food and feed supply to the local market. In this regard, recycling abundant organic and inorganic wastes could help providing sustainable sources of nutrients to crops and synthetic materials for production systems, which will also reduce risks of environmental contamination due to waste landfilling. Furthermore, smart greenhouses powered microgrid may be considered as a key solution to introduce new technologies in agriculture taking advantages of renewable energy, advances in monitoring techniques, artificial intelligence, meeting and communication infrastructure. This may drive comprehensive transition to precision activities creating environmental and socio-economic benefits, although assuring the high-performance capacities, fostering thus the modernization of the agricultural sector. Hence, the FEWS program will enlist the application of various interdisciplinary scientific approaches for preserving the country’s natural environment, following a sustainable way, a “cradle-to-cradle” and a “closing the loop” reasoning in the agricultural, renewable energy and waste management sectors.  

 

 

USDA Grant: Project Summary

 

PD- Jason C. White, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES); Co-PD- David Howard Fairbrother, Johns Hopkins University (JHU); Co-PD- Wade Elmer, CAES

     This is a Food and Agriculture Science Enhancement (FASE) Strengthening Standard Grant submitted to the USDA AFRI Foundational Program’s Agriculture Systems and Technology Program Area; Priority Code A1511 “Nanotechnology for Agricultural and Food Systems”

     By 2050, the global population will exceed 9 billion, making maintaining global food security one of the most significant challenges we face as a species. Food production will need to increase by 70% but importantly, year-over-year-yield increases for many crops have been declining. Additionally, the lack of sustainability of current agriculture will confound maintaining global food security. For example, the low efficiency of nutrient delivery (10-20%) is a significant constraint, wasting energy and water resources, and causing environmental damage as growers “over-apply” to adequately feed crops. Consequently, there has been great interest in nano-enabled approaches to increase both the efficiency and targeting of nutrient delivery in agriculture.

     Phosphorus use will exceed 26, 000 Gg/year by 2050, although delivery efficiency is typically only 10-15%. In addition to being unsustainable, the excessive use of P is a threat to aquatic environments and human health. We have preliminary data demonstrating that a biodegradable polymer-nanoparticle composite containing phosphate nanoparticles promotes plant growth as effectively as traditional fertilizers while reducing P run off by 10-fold. Building on this, we will develop a suite of P-containing biodegradable polymer nanocomposites able to deliver nutritionally required amounts of P to different crops in a spatially and temporally precise fashion. Moreover, this P delivery will be achieved with significantly reduced input amounts and with dramatic reductions in environmentally damaging P run-off/leachate. The long-term goal of this project is to develop a safe and sustainable biopolymer-based nanofertilizer platform for macronutrient delivery in both field and urban agriculture scenarios. Our three objectives are:

Obj.1- Identify biodegradation rates and P leaching/retention characteristics of different P-containing biodegradable nanocomposites in different soils. This information will enable us test our hypothesis that P release rates are directly correlated with and controlled by polymer biodegradation and that this mechanistic relationship allows material tunability.

Obj.2- Determine the viability of P-containing biodegradable polymer nanocomposites to enhance growth of different crops while minimizing P run off in greenhouse-based plant studies. 

Obj.3- Validate P-containing biodegradable polymer nanocomposite performance for a range of different crops at field scale.

     Our approach will be to develop a suite of P-containing biodegradable polymer nanocomposites that release P at tunable rates in response to polymer biodegradation. Once material properties have been optimized, greenhouse and field trials will be conducted with crops of varying nutritional demands (lettuce, tomato, soybean, corn, wheat) to demonstrate tunable efficacy across species and soil conditions, as well as across multiple planting cycles.  Although NP use in agriculture is increasing, delivery strategies that are precise and accurate both spatially and temporally remain elusive.  Novel and tunable P delivery approaches such as those developed in this work have great potential to significantly improve nutrient utilization and facilitate efforts to maintain global food security. To support this work, we will establish a Center of Excellence that will deploy a unique combination of educational and dissemination strategies to engage a range of stakeholders in this project.

 

Nanotechnology has great opportunities to improve plant agriculture. Nanopesticides might have a higher efficacy and help to prevent runoff to surface and ground water. Nanotechnology-based genetic engineering might offer tremendous advantages compared to classical techniques. Plants could be used as sensors to provide information about their nutritional or health status. Nanotechnology might be used to modify the soil microbiome or be used in soil conditioning, and nano-carrier bound fertilizers might be more efficient than conventional products. Nano-enabled coatings might improve seed quality"(Hoffman et al. 2020. Moving forward responsibly in nanotechnology enabled plant agriculture. Nature Food, 1, 416–425). 

 

Effect of nanoparticle elements on crop disease (Servin et al. 2015. A review of the use of engineered nanomaterials to suppress plant disease and enhance crop yield. J. Nano. Res. DOI:10.1007/s11051-015-2907-7).

 

Technology readiness level (TRL) for proposed application areas or approaches for nano-enabled technologies that can benefit agriculture. The TRL was determined based on available data regarding the maturity of the technology including the scale at which the materials or approach has been applied, and the number of studies that provide evidence of efficacy, and the number of commercially available products. The technology performance level (TPL) was determined based on expert judgment regarding the potential magnitude of the impacts that each technology may potentially provide to improve the sustainability of agriculture. (Hoffman et al. 2020. Moving forward responsibly in nanotechnology enabled plant agriculture. Nature Food1, 416–425).

 

Core Research Team Information

Jason C. White, Ph.D.: Director, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station

Staff Biography: https://portal.ct.gov/CAES/ABOUT-CAES/Staff-Biographies/Jason-C-White

Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=AApdCWkAAAAJ&hl=en

 

       Dr. White is the Project Director. He is also the Director of the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station and has been studying the interactions of chemicals and plants for 24 years. Dr. White received his Ph.D. in Environmental Toxicology from Cornell University in 1997. He is Immediate Past President of the International Phytotechnology Society, Managing Editor for the International Journal of Phytoremediation, and the Editorial Advisory Boards of Environmental Science & Technology and Environmental Science & Technology Letters. He is also on the Editorial Board of NanoImpact and Environmental Pollution. Dr. White’s total competitive research funding exceeds $900,000/year. As of the beginning of this project, he has published 250 papers that have been cited 14,920 times (google scholar link above), with many focusing on the interactions between engineered nanomaterials and plant species and has an H-index of 68.

 

       Specifically, Dr. White serves as Project Director, overseeing all administrative activities of the USDA grant, including this Center of Excellence (CeNaPD). Dr. White also serves as quality assurance officer for the grant; the CAES Department of Analytical Chemistry, which Dr. White lead form 2009-2020, is ISO 17025 accredited (https://www.a2la.org/scopepdf/4133-01.pdf) for a food safety testing program (both human and animal food) with the CT Department of Consumer Protection, the CT Department of Agriculture and the US FDA. From a technical perspective, Dr. White, along with CoPD Elmer, will directly oversee the research activities of the Post-doctoral Associate hired on the project, Dr. Jaya Borgatta. In addition, Dr. White has four other Post-doctoral Associates and several international visitors in his laboratory; the collective expertise and select resources from that larger team will be frequently leveraged in this project.  

 

Wade Elmer, Ph.D.: Department of Plant Pathology and Ecology, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station

Staff Biography: http://www.ct.gov/caes/cwp/view.asp?a=2812&q=345106

Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=xprubQcAAAAJ&hl=en

 

       Dr.  Elmer serves as an Emeritus Scientist at The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.He received his Ph.D in Plant Pathology from Michigan State University in 1985 and began his career at The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station in 1987. Understanding the mechanisms of disease suppression of ornamentals, vegetables, and field crops through manipulations of mineral nutrition has been his research focus for over 35 years. For the past 9 years, he has advanced innovative strategies for using metal oxide nanoparticles to improve plant health and increase yields. Dr. Elmer has edited four books, authored, or co-authored over 127 peer-reviewed papers, 26 book chapters, and written over 100 articles for trade magazines and symposia.

 

Howard Fairbrother, Ph.D.: Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University

JHU Biography: https://chemistry.jhu.edu/directory/howard-fairbrother/

Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=rAWNwnEAAAAJ

 

       
Research in the Fairbrother group involves aspects of environmental, analytical, physical and materials science and is focused on (i) understanding the mechanisms of depositing nanostructures, and (ii) exploring the environmental implications and applications of nanomaterials. Understanding Mechanisms of Depositing Nanostructures: One area of active research in our group is to develop a molecular level understanding of technologically important deposition processes are being used to create nanostructures. As part of this effort we are currently collaborating with researchers at the University of Florida and the University of Iceland to identify the surface chemistry and physics associated with the focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) of metallic nanostructures using organometallic precursors.

       Environmental Implications and Applications of Nanomaterials: We have a wide array of projects focused on exploring the environmental implications as well as the potential applications of engineered nanomaterials, particularly carbon nanotubes. Examples include: (1) exploring the release rates of carbon nanotubes and quantum dots from polymer nanocomposites, (2) photochemistry of carbon based nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes, graphene and carbon dots, (3) impact of heteroatoms on the flame retarding properties of carbon nanotubes, (4) effect of carbon nanotube incorporation on biofilm formation and biodegradation properties of polymers. Many of these projects are highly collaborative and involve significant interactions with the Department of Geography and Environmental  Engineering (DoGEE) at Johns Hopkins, researchers in the EPA funded center on the Life Cycle of Nanomaterials (LCNano), and the Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology (CSN) funded by the National Science Foundation.

       Experimental Approach: In all of our studies we use a wide array of experimental techniques, including Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Mass Spectrometry, Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) and UV-Vis Spectroscopy. We have also an array of electron spectroscopies, particularly Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for materials characterization. The Fairbrother lab also maintains and operates the Johns Hopkins University University surface analytical laboratories which are available for use by researchers both within and outside the university.

 

Jaya Borgatta, Ph.D.

Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=sC5dxp8AAAAJ

 

 

       Jaya Borgatta received her Ph.D in chemistry at the University of Wisconsin – Madison in 2021. Her research interests focus on the synthesis of nanomaterial systems for nutrient delivery, materials characterization, and understanding how nanomaterials can influence plant health and growth.

 

Leslie Sigmon: Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University

https://sites.krieger.jhu.edu/fairbrother-lab/

 

       Leslie is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Chemistry at Johns Hopkins University. Her work is focused on investigating the origin of carbon dot photoluminescence and on nano-enabled fertilizers to enhance plant growth and minimize nutrient runoff. Leslie received her B.Sc. in Chemistry: University of North Carolina, Asheville, 2016.

 

 

CeNaPD Publications:
  1. Sakhno, Y., Ma, C., White, J. C., Jaisi, D. (2021). Role of cation substitution in calcium phosphate based novel nanofertilizer impacts on lettuce (Lactuca sativa) yield. ACS Sust. Chem. Eng. Submitted.
  2. Sigmon, L. R., Adisa, I., Liu, B., Elmer, W. H., White, J. C., Dimkpa, C. O., Fairbrother, D. H. (2021). Biodegradable polymer nanocomposites provide effective delivery and reduced runoff of phosphorus during plant growth. ACS Agric. Sci. Technol. DOI: 10.1021/acsagscitech.1c00149
  3. Li, Q., Ma, C., White, J. C., Xing, B. (2021). Effects of phosphorus ensembled nanomaterials on nutrient uptake and distribution in Glycine max L. Agronomy 11:1086.
  4. Ma, C., Li, Q., Jia, W., Shang, H., Zhao, J., Hao, Y., Li, C., Tomko, M., Elmer, W., White, J. C., Xing, B. (2021). Role of nanoscale hydroxyapatite in disease suppression of Fusarium-infected tomato. Environ. Sci. Technol. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.1c00901

 

Presentations and Posters:

Contact Dr. Jason C. White for additional information.

 

Other Nanotechnology-related Sites of Interest:

The NSF Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology https://susnano.wisc.edu/

 

Nanyang Technological University-Harvard University TH Chan School of Public Health Initiative for Sustainable Nanotechnology

https://healthtech.ntu.edu.sg/Research/CollaborationProgrammes/NTU-HSPH%20Initiative%20for%20Sustainable%20Nanotechnology/Pages/Home.aspx

 

Harvard University TH Chan School of Public Health Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nano/

 

Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization (SNO): http://www.susnano.org/

 

National Nanotechnology Initiative: http://www.nano.gov/

 

University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN): http://www.cein.ucla.edu/new/

 

Duke University Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEINT): http://ceint.duke.edu/

 

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Nanotechnology Portal: http://www.nist.gov/nanotechnology-portal.cfm

 

Sustainable Nanotechnologies Project: http://www.sun-fp7.eu/

 

US Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture: https://nifa.usda.gov/topic/nanotechnology

 

Nanosystems Engineering Research Center for Nanotechnology-Enabled Water Treatment http://www.newtcenter.org/

 

National Institute of Health (NIH): https://www.nih.gov/research-training/nanotechnology-nih

 

US Food and Drug Administration (FDA): http://www.fda.gov/ScienceResearch/SpecialTopics/Nanotechnology/default.htm

 

US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): https://www.epa.gov/chemical-research/research-nanomaterials

 

Arizona State University, Center for Nanotechnology in Society: http://cns.asu.edu/

 

Center for Food Safety: http://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/issues/682/nanotechnology#

 

CAES Center for Nanotechnology and Agricultural Pathogen Suppression (CeNAPS)

https://portal.ct.gov/CAES/USDA-Center-of-Excellence/USDA-Center-of-Excellence/The-Center-for-Nanotechnology-and-Agricultural-Pathogens-Suppression-CeNAPS

 

CAES Center for Nanoscale Sulfur Research (CENASR)

https://portal.ct.gov/CAES/USDA-Center-of-Excellence/USDA-Center-of-Excellence/The-Center-for-Nanoscale-Sulfur-Research-CeNaSR

 

Related Publications of Interest:
  1. Deng, C., Wang, Y., Navarro, G., Sun, Y., Cota-Ruiz, K., Rawat, S., Tan, W., Peralta-Videa, J., Adisa, I., Dominguez, O. E., Hernandez-Viezcas, J. A., Niu, G., Li, C., White, J. C., Gardea-Torresdey, J. (2022). Copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles affect yield, nutritional quality, and auxin associated gene expression in weedy and cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) grains. Sci. Tot. Environ., 810, 152260.

     

  2. Wu, T., Liao, X., Zou, Y., Yang, K., White, J. C., Lin, D. (2022). Fe-based nanomaterial transformation to amorphous Fe: Enhanced alfalfa rhizoremediation of PCBs-contaminated soil. J. Hazard. Mat., 127973.

     

  3. Shidore, T., Zuverza-Mena, N., White, J. C., da Silva, W. (2021). Nano-enabled delivery of RNA molecules for prolonged anti-viral protection in crop plants. ACS Applied Nano Materials. doi.org/10.1021/acsanm.1c03512.

     

  4. Chen, S., Yan, X., Tan, X., Zhang, W., Huang, Y., White, J. C., Zhao, L. (2021). Environmental implications of MoS2 nanosheets on rice and associated soil microbial communities. Chemosphere, 133004.

     

  5. Qu, H., Ma, C., Xing, W., Xue, L., Liu, H., White, J. C., Chen, G., Xing, B. 2021 Effects of copper oxide nanoparticles on Salix growth, soil enzyme activity and microbial community composition in a wetland mesocosm. J. Haz. Mat., 127676.

     

  6. Aytac, Z., Xu, J., Kumar, S., Eitzer, B. D., Xu, T., Vaze, N., Ng, K. W., White, J. C., Chan-Park, M. Luo, Y., Demokritou, P. (2021). Enzyme and relative humidity responsive antimicrobial fibers for active food packaging. ACS Appl. Mat. Int., 13(42):50298-50308

     

  7. White, J. C., Gardea-Torresdey, J. (2021). Nanoscale agrochemicals for crop health: A key line of Attack in the battle for global food security. Environ. Sci. Technol., 55(20), 13413–13416

     

  8. Meselhy, A. G., Sharma, S., Guo. Z., Singh, S., Yuan, H., Tripathi, R. D., Xing, B., Musante, C., White, J. C., Parkash-Dhankher, O. (2021). Nanoscale sulfur improves plant growth and reduces arsenic toxicity and accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) Environ. Sci. Technol., doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.1c05495.

     

  9. Chen, S., Shi, N., Huang, M., Tan, X., Yan, X., Wang, A., Huang, Y., Ji, R., Zhou, D., Zhu, Y.-G., Keller, A. K., Gardea-Torresdey, J. L., White, J. C., Zhao, L. 2021. MoS2 nanosheets-cyanobacteria interaction: Reprogrammed carbon and nitrogen metabolism. ACS Nano. DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.1c05656.

     

  10. Marmiroli, M., Pagano, L., Rossi, R., De La Torre-Roche, R., Lepore, G. O., Ruotolo, R., Gariani, G., Bonanni, V., Pollstri, S., Puri, A., Gianoncelli, A., Aquilanti, G., d’Acapito, F., White, J. C., Marmiroli, N. (2021). Copper oxide nanomaterial fate in plant tissue: Nanoscale impacts on reproductive tissues.Environ. Sci. Technol. 55(15), 10769–10783

     

  11. Adeel, M., Shakoor, N., Shafiq, M., Pavlicek, A., Part, F., Zafiu, C., Raza, A., Zhang, P., Jilani, G., White, J. C., Ehmoser, E.-K., Lynch, I., Rui, Y. (2021). A critical review of the environmental impacts of manufactured nano-objects on earthworm species. Environ. Poll., 290:118041.

     

  12. Hou, J., Hu, C., White, J. C., Yang, K., Zhu, L., Lin, D. (2021). Nano-Zoo Interfacial Interaction as a Design Principle for Hybrid Soil Remediation Technology. ACS Nano. DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.1c05180

     

  13. Sigmon, L. R., Adisa, I., Liu, B., Elmer, W. H., White, J. C., Dimkpa, C. O., Fairbrother, D. H. (2021). Biodegradable polymer nanocomposites provide effective delivery and reduced runoff of phosphorus during plant growth. ACS Agric. Sci. Technol. DOI: 10.1021/acsagscitech.1c00149

     

  14. Cao, X., Pan, X., Couvillion, S., Zhang, T., Tamez, C., Bramer, L. M., White, J. C., Qian, W.-J., Thrall, B. D., Ng, K. W., Hu, X., Demokritou, P. (2021). Fate, cytotoxicity and cellular metabolomic impact of ingested carbon dots using simulated digestion and a triculture small intestinal epithelial model. NanoImpact, 23, 100349.

     

  15. Zhu, J., Wang, J., Shen, Y., Zhan, X., Li, A., White, J. C., Gardea-Torresdey, J., Xing, B. (2021). Role of charge and size in the translocation and distribution of zinc oxide particles in wheat cells. ACS Sust. Chem. Eng., 9(34), 11556-11564. https://doi.org/10.1021/acssuschemeng.1c04080

     

  16. Cao, X., Wang, C., Luo, X., Yu, L., White, J. C., Elmer, W., Parkash Dhankher, O., Wang, Z., Xing, B. (2021). Elemental sulfur nanoparticles enhance disease resistance in tomato. ACS Nano. doi.org/10.1021/acsnano.1c02917.

     

  17. Elmer, W., Zuverza-Mena, N., Triplett, L., Silady, R., Roberts, E., White, J. C. (2021). Foliar application of copper oxide nanoparticles suppress Fusarium wilt development on chrysanthemum. Environ. Sci. Technol. doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.1c02323.

     

  18. Shang, H., Ma, C., Li, C., Zhao, J., Elmer, W., White, J. C., Xing, B. (2021). CuO nanoparticle-embedded hydrogels to enhance nutrient supply and growth of lettuce infected with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lactucae. Environ. Sci. Technol. DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.1c00777.

     

  19. Wang, Y., Chen, S., Deng, C., Shi, X., Cota-Ruiz, K., White, J. C., Zhao, L., Gardea-Torresdey, J. L. (2021). Metabolomic analysis reveals dose-dependent alteration of maize (Zea mays L.) metabolites and mineral nutrient profiles upon exposure to zerovalent iron nanoparticles. NanoImpact, 100336.

     

  20. Adeel, M., Shakoor, N., White, J. C., Ahmed, M. A., Jilani, G., Rui, Y. (2021). Bioavailability and toxicity of nanoscale/bulk rare earth oxides in soil: Physiological and ultrastructural alterations in Eisenia fetida. Environ. Sci.: Nano, 8, 1654.

      

  21. Salinas, F., Astete, C. E., Waldvogel, J. H., Navarro, S., White, J. C., Elmer, W., Davis, J. A., Sabliov, C. M. (2021). Effects of engineered lignin-graft-PLGA and zein-based nanoparticles on soybean health. NanoImpact, 100329.

     

  22. Li, Q., Ma, C., White, J. C., Xing, B. (2021). Effects of phosphorus ensembled nanomaterials on nutrient uptake and distribution in Glycine max L. Agronomy, 11:1086.

     

  23. Ma, C., Li, Q., Jia, W., Shang, H., Zhao, J., Hao, Y., Li, C., Tomko, M., Elmer, W., White, J. C., Xing, B. (2021). Role of nanoscale hydroxyapatite in disease suppression of Fusarium-infected tomato. Environ. Sci. Technol. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.1c00901.

     

  24. Noori, A., Bharath, L. P., White, J. C. (2021). Type-specific impacts of Ag on the protein profile of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Int. J. Phytorem. In press.

     

  25. Adeel, M., Farooq, T., White, J. C., Gardea-Torresdey, J. L., Rui, Y. (2021). COVIDÔÇÉ19 and Nanoscience in the Developing World: Rapid Detection and Remediation in Wastewater. Nanomaterials, 11, 991.

     

  26. Li, C., Ma, C., Shang, H., White, J. C., McClements, D. J., Xing, B. (2021). Food-grade titanium dioxide particles decrease the bioaccessibility of iron released from spinach leaves in simulated human gastrointestinal tract. Environ. Sci.: Nano., 8, 1269-1282.

     

  27. Ma, C., Hao, Y., Zhao, J., Zuverza-Mena, N., Meselhy, A. G., Parkash Dhankher, O., Rui, Y., White, J. C., Xing, B. (2021). Graphitic carbon nitride (C3N4) reduces cadmium and arsenic phytotoxicity and accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Nanomaterials, 11(4), 839.

     

  28. Borgatta, J. B., Lochbaum, C. A., Elmer, W., White, J. C., Pedersen, J. A., Hamers, R. J. (2021). Biomolecular corona formation on CuO nanoparticles in plant xylem fluid. Environ. Sci.: Nano., 8, 1067-1080.

     

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