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Connecticut Resident Income Tax Information


  • What’s New for 2021?
  • Who Must File a Connecticut Resident Return
  • When to File
  • Gross Income Test
  • Filing the Connecticut Income Tax Return Electronically
  • Special Information for Nonresident Aliens
  • Resident, Part-Year Resident, or Nonresident
  • Military Personnel Filing Requirements
  • Connecticut Adjusted Gross Income
  • Extension Requests
  • Estimated Tax Payments for Tax Year 2022
  • Annualized Income Installment Method
  • Filing Form CT-1040ES
  • Special Rules for Farmers and Fishermen
  • Filing Form CT-2210
  • Interest and Penalties
  • Refund Information
  • Payment Options

What’s New for 2021?

Property Tax Credit

The maximum amount of property tax credit that a taxpayer may claim and the eligibility requirements, both of which currently apply to taxable year 2020, have been extended to taxable years 2021 and 2022. Specifically, the maximum amount of property tax credit is $200. Additionally, to qualify for the property tax credit, a taxpayer, or the taxpayer’s spouse if married filing jointly, must be 65 years of age or older by the end of the taxable year, or the taxpayer must have claimed at least one dependent on your federal income tax return.

 

Earned Income Tax Credit Increase 

For taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2021, the earned income tax credit for Connecticut residents has been increased to 30.5% of the federal earned income credit.

 

Subtraction Modification for Certain IRA Distributions

Beginning with taxable year 2023, a subtraction modification for distributions from individual retirement accounts (IRAs), other than Roth IRAs, will be phased in over a four year period. The subtraction modification may be claimed by taxpayers whose federal adjusted gross income is less than $75,000 (for single, married filing separately, and head of household) or $100,000 (for married filing jointly).

 

The subtraction modification will be allowed to the extent the IRA distributions are included in federal adjusted gross income and will be phased in as follows:

 

Taxable Year

Subtraction Equal to:

2023 25% of IRA distribution

2024 50% of IRA distribution

2025 75% of IRA distribution

2026 and after 100% of IRA distribution

 

 

Connecticut Teachers’ Retirement System Income

Under prior law, retired teachers were only allowed to claim the teachers’ pension subtraction on the income they received from the Connecticut Teachers’ Retirement System.

 

For taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2021, retired teachers are now allowed to claim either the teachers’ pension subtraction or the pension and annuity subtraction (if their adjusted gross income is below the applicable threshold) on the income they receive from the Connecticut Teachers’ Retirement System.

 

For a detailed list of What’s New, see SN 2021(6), 2021 Legislative Changes Affecting the Income Tax


Who Must File a Connecticut Resident Return  

You must file a Connecticut resident income tax return if you were a resident for the entire year and any of the following is true for the 2021 taxable year:

  • You had Connecticut income tax withheld;
  • You made estimated tax payments to Connecticut or a payment with Form CT‑1040 EXT;
  • You had a PE Tax Credit;
  • You meet the Gross Income Test;
  • You had a federal alternative minimum tax liability; or
  • You are claiming the Connecticut earned income tax credit (CT EITC).

 

If none of the above apply, do not file a Connecticut resident income tax return.

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Gross income means all income you received in the form of money, goods, property, services not exempt from federal income tax, and any additions to income required to be reported on Form CT1040, Schedule 1.

 

Gross income includes income from all sources within Connecticut and outside of Connecticut. Gross income includes but is not limited to:

  • Compensation for services, including wages, fees, commissions, taxable fringe benefits, and similar items;
  • Gross income from a business;
  • Capital gains;
  • Interest and dividends;
  • Gross rental income;
  • Gambling winnings;
  • Alimony;
  • Taxable pensions and annuities;
  • Prizes and awards;
  • Your share of income from partnerships, S corporations, estates, or trusts;
  • IRA distributions;
  • Unemployment compensation;
  • Federally taxable Social Security benefits; and
  • Federally taxable disability benefits.

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When to File

 

Your Connecticut income tax return is due on or before April 15, 2022. If you are not a calendar year filer, your return is due on or before the fifteenth day of the fourth month following the close of your taxable year. If the due date falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, the return will be considered timely filed if filed by the next business day.

 

In 2022, the due date for filing a Connecticut Income Tax Return (April 15) falls on a Friday which is a legal holiday in the District of Columbia (Emancipation Day). Therefore, for filing purposes, the return (and payment) will be considered timely if filed on or before Monday, April 18, 2022.

 

Your return meets the timely filed and timely payment rules if the U.S. Postal Service cancellation date, or the date recorded or marked by a designated private delivery service (PDS) using a designated type of service, is on or before the due date.

 

Not all services provided by these designated PDSs qualify. This list is subject to change. See Policy Statement 2016(4), Designated Private Delivery Services and Designated Types of Service, for a current list of qualified PDSs.

 

If Form CT‑1040 is filed late or all the tax due is not paid with the return, see Interest and Penalties to determine if interest and penalty must be reported with the return.

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Gross Income Test

 

You must file a Connecticut income tax return if your gross income for the 2021 taxable year exceeds:

  • $12,000 and you are married filing separately;
  • $15,000 and you are filing single;
  • $19,000 and you are filing head of household; or
  • $24,000 and you are married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er).

 

The following examples explain the gross income test for a Connecticut resident:

 

Example 1: Your only income is from a sole proprietorship and you file federal Form 1040 reporting the following on Schedule C:

Gross Income                            $100,000

Expenses                                     ($92,000)

Net Income                                     $8,000

 

Because the gross income of $100,000 exceeds the minimum requirement, you must file a Connecticut income tax return.

 

Example 2: You received $8,000 in federally nontaxable Social Security benefits and $11,000 in interest income. Since nontaxable Social Security benefits are not included in gross income, you do not have to file a Connecticut income tax return unless Connecticut tax was withheld or estimated tax payments were made.

 

Example 3: You are a single individual. You received $15,000 in wage income and $1,000 in federally-exempt interest from California state bonds. Your gross income (federal adjusted gross income with any additions to income from Form CT‑1040, Schedule 1, Line 31, Interest on state and local government obligations other than Connecticut) is $16,000.  Therefore, you must file a Connecticut income tax return.

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Filing the Connecticut Income Tax Return Electronically

 

Most Connecticut taxpayers are able to use the DRS Taxpayer Service Center (TSC) to file their Connecticut income tax return at portal.ct.gov/TSC. Electronically filing and paying your taxes is easy and accurate. It provides you with confirmation of receipt and reduces the possibility of errors.

 

While some taxpayers may be reluctant to make electronic payments for security reasons, we want to assure you that our electronic funds transfer is safe and secure.

 

You may electronically file your Connecticut income tax return through the TSC if all of the following are true:

 

  • You filed a Connecticut income tax return in the last three years; or you have never filed a Connecticut income tax return, but you have a valid Connecticut driver’s license or Connecticut non-driver ID;

     

  • Your filing status is the same as the last return DRS has on file, or, if your filing status changed since your last filing, your new filing status is displayed in the drop-down menu.If your new filing status is not displayed in the drop-down menu, visit the DRS website at portal.ct.gov/DRS and select For Individuals for information on other e-filing options;

     

  • You are not filing Form CT1040 CRC, Claim of Right Credit;

     

  • You are not filing Form CT19IT, Title 19 Status Release Form;

     

  • You are not filing federal Form 1310, Statement of Person Claiming Refund Due a Deceased Taxpayer;

     

  • You have no more than ten Forms W‑2 or 1099 that show Connecticut income tax withheld; and

     

  • You have no more than ten Schedules CT K‑1 and Schedules CT‑1041 K-1 showing a PE Tax Credit allocated to you.

 

Do not send a paper copy of your electronically filed return with the payment. Send only Form CT1040V, 2021 Connecticut Electronic Filing Payment Voucher, with your payment.

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Special Information for Nonresident Aliens

 

If you are a nonresident alien, you must file a Connecticut income tax return if you meet the requirements of Who Must File a Connecticut Resident Return. In determining whether you meet the gross income test, you must take into account any income not subject to federal income tax under an income tax treaty between the United States and the country of which you are a citizen or resident. Income tax treaty provisions are disregarded for Connecticut income tax purposes. Any treaty income you report on federal Form 1040NR and not subject to federal income tax must be added to your federal adjusted gross income. See Form CT-1040, Schedule 1, Line 37, or Form CT-1040NR/PY, Schedule 1, Line 39.

 

If you do not have and are not eligible for a Social Security Number (SSN), you must obtain an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) from the IRS and enter it in the space provided for an SSN.

 

You must have applied for and been issued an ITIN before you file your income tax return. However, if you have not received your ITIN by April 15, file your return without the ITIN, enter Applied For or NRA in the SSN field, pay the tax due, and attach a copy of federal Form W‑7, Application for IRS Individual Taxpayer Identification Number. DRS will contact you upon receipt of your return and will hold your return until you receive your ITIN and you forward the information to us. DRS cannot process your return until we receive the ITIN.

 

A married nonresident alien may not file a joint Connecticut income tax return unless the nonresident alien is married to a citizen or resident of the United States and they have made an election to file a joint federal income tax return and they do, in fact, file a joint federal income tax return. Any married individual filing federal Form 1040NR is not eligible to file a joint federal income tax return or a joint Connecticut income tax return and must file a Connecticut income tax return as filing separately.

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Resident, Part-Year Resident, or Nonresident Information

 

The following terms are used in this section:

 

Domicile (permanent legal residence) is the place you intend to have as your permanent home. It is the place you intend to return to whenever you are away. You can have only one domicile although you may have more than one place to live. Your domicile does not change until you move to a new location and definitely intend to make your permanent home there. If you move to a new location but intend to stay there only for a limited time (no matter how long), your domicile does not change. This also applies if you are working in a foreign country.

 

Permanent place of abode is a residence (a building or structure where a person can live) that you permanently maintain, whether or not you own it, and generally includes a residence owned by or leased to your spouse. A place of abode is not permanent if it is maintained only during a temporary stay for the accomplishment of a particular purpose.

Resident

You are a resident for the 2021 taxable year if:

 

  • Connecticut was your domicile (permanent legal residence) for the entire 2021 taxable year; or

     

  • You were not domiciled in Connecticut but you maintained a permanent place of abode in Connecticut during the entire 2021 taxable year and spent a total of more than 183 days in Connecticut during the 2021 taxable year.

Nonresident aliens who meet either of these conditions are considered Connecticut residents even if federal Form 1040NR is filed for federal income tax purposes. See also Special Rules for Married Individuals and Special Information for Nonresident Aliens.

 

If you are a resident and you meet the requirements for Who Must File a Connecticut Resident Return for the 2021 taxable year, you must file Form CT-1040, Connecticut Resident Income Tax Return.

 

Part-Year Resident

You are a part-year resident for the 2021 taxable year if you changed your permanent legal residence by moving into or out of Connecticut during the 2021 taxable year. If you are a part-year resident, you may not elect to be treated as a resident individual.

 

If you are a part-year resident and you meet the requirements for Who Must File Form CT-1040NR/PY for the 2021 taxable year, you must file Form CT-1040NR/PY, Connecticut Nonresident and Part-Year Resident Income Tax Return.

 

Nonresident

You are a nonresident for the 2021 taxable year if you are neither a resident nor a part-year resident for the 2021 taxable year.

 

If you are a nonresident and you meet the requirements for Who Must File Form CT1040NR/PY for the 2021 taxable year, you must file Form CT‑1040NR/PY.

 

If you meet all of the conditions in Group A or Group B, you may be treated as a nonresident for 2021 even if your domicile was Connecticut.

Group A

  1. You did not maintain a permanent place of abode in Connecticut for the entire 2021 taxable year;

     

  2. You maintained a permanent place of abode outside of Connecticut for the entire 2021 taxable year; and

     

  3. You spent not more than 30 days in the aggregate in Connecticut during the 2021 taxable year.

 

Group B

  1. You were in a foreign country for at least 450 days during any period of 548 consecutive days;

     

  2. During this period of 548 consecutive days, you did not spend more than 90 days in Connecticut and you did not maintain a permanent place of abode in Connecticut at which your spouse (unless legally separated) or minor children spent more than 90 days; and

     

  3. During the nonresident portion of the taxable year in which the 548‑day period begins, and during the nonresident portion of the taxable year in which the 548‑day period ends, you were present in Connecticut for no more than the number of days that bears the same ratio to 90 as the number of days in the portion of the taxable year bears to 548.See the calculation below:

 

Number of days in the nonresident portion x 90 = Maximum days allowed in Connecticut

548

 

See Special Notice 2000(17), 2000 Legislation Affecting the Connecticut Income Tax.

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Military Personnel Filing Requirements

 

Military personnel and their spouses who claim Connecticut as their state of residence but are stationed elsewhere are subject to Connecticut income tax.

 

If you enlisted in the military service as a Connecticut resident and have not established a new domicile (permanent legal residence) elsewhere, you are required to file a resident income tax return unless you meet all of the conditions in Group A or Group B for being treated as a nonresident. See Resident, PartYear Resident, or Nonresident above.

 

If your permanent home (domicile) was outside Connecticut when you entered the military, you do not become a Connecticut resident because you are stationed and live in Connecticut. As a nonresident, your military pay is not subject to Connecticut income tax. However, income you receive from Connecticut sources while you are a nonresident may be subject to Connecticut income tax. See the instructions for a Nonresident. See Example, below.

 

Example: Jill is a resident of Florida. She enlisted in the Navy in Florida and was stationed in Groton, Connecticut. She earned $38,000 in military pay.

 

If Jill had no other income . . .

Since Jill resided and enlisted in Florida, she is considered a resident of Florida and does not have to file a Connecticut return. Military personnel are residents of the state in which they resided when they enlisted.

 

If Jill had a part-time job in Connecticut . . .

Her Connecticut-sourced income from nonmilitary employment is taxable. Jill must file Form CT‑1040NR/PY to report the income.

 

Combat Zone

The income tax return of any individual in the U.S. Armed Forces serving in a combat zone or injured and hospitalized while serving in a combat zone is due 180 days after returning. There will be no penalty or interest charged. For any individual who dies while on active duty in a combat zone or as a result of injuries received in a combat zone, no income tax or return is due for the year of death or for any prior taxable year ending on or after the first day serving in a combat zone. If any tax was previously paid for those years, the tax will be refunded to the legal representative of the estate or to the surviving spouse upon the filing of a return on behalf of the decedent. In filing the return on behalf of the decedent, the legal representative or the surviving spouse should enter zero tax due and attach a statement to the return along with a copy of the death certificate.

 

Combat zone is an area designated by an Executive Order from the President of the United States as areas in which the U.S. Armed Forces are engaging or have engaged in combat. A combat zone also includes an area designated by the federal government as a qualified hazardous duty area.

 

Spouses of military personnel and civilians supporting the military in a combat zone region who are away from their permanent duty stations, but are not within the designated combat zone, are also eligible for the 180 day extension.

 

Individuals requesting an extension under combat zone provisions should print both the name of the combat zone and the operation they served with at the top of their Connecticut tax return. This is the same combat zone or operation name provided on their federal income tax return. See Informational Publication 2019(5), Connecticut Income Tax Information for Armed Forces Personnel and Veterans.

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Connecticut Adjusted Gross Income

 

Connecticut adjusted gross income is your federal adjusted gross income as properly reported on federal Form 1040, Line 11, or federal Form 1040-SR, Line 11, and any Connecticut modifications required to be reported on Form CT-1040, Schedule 1.

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Extension Requests

 

Extension of Time to File 

To request an extension of time to file your return, you must file Form CT1040 EXT, Application for Extension of Time to File Connecticut Income Tax Return for Individuals, and pay all the tax you expect to owe on or before the due date.

 

Visit portal.ct.gov/TSC to file your extension electronically.

 

Form CT‑1040 EXT extends only the time to file your return; it does not extend the time to pay your tax due. See Interest and Penalties if you do not pay all the tax due with your extension request.

 

You do not need to file Form CT1040 EXT if you:

 

  • Have requested an extension of time to file your 2021 federal income tax return and you expect to owe no additional Connecticut income tax for the 2021 taxable year after taking into account any Connecticut income tax withheld from your wages, any Connecticut income tax payments you have made, and any Pass‑Through Entity Tax Credit (PE Tax Credit) you are allowed to claim; or

 

  • Pay your expected 2021 Connecticut income tax due using a credit card on or before the due date.

 

You must file Form CT1040 EXT if you:

 

  • Did not request an extension of time to file your federal income tax return, but you are requesting an extension of time to file your Connecticut income tax return; or

     

  • Have requested an extension of time to file your federal income tax return but you expect to owe additional Connecticut income tax for 2021 and wish to submit a payment with Form CT‑1040 EXT.

 

If you file an extension request with a payment after the due date, generally April 15, DRS will deny your extension request.

 

U.S. Citizens Living Abroad

If you are a U.S. citizen or resident living outside the United States and Puerto Rico, or if you are in the armed forces of the United States serving outside the United States and Puerto Rico and are unable to file a Connecticut income tax return on time, you must file Form CT‑1040 EXT. You must also pay the amount of tax due on or before the original due date of the return.

 

Include with Form CT‑1040 EXT a statement that you are a U.S. citizen or resident living outside the United States and Puerto Rico, or in the armed forces of the United States serving outside the United States and Puerto Rico, and that you qualify for a federal automatic extension. If your application is approved, the due date is extended for six months.

 

If you received a federal extension of time to file beyond six months, to qualify for the federal foreign earned income exclusion and for the foreign housing exclusion or deduction, you may file your Connecticut return using the federal extension due date. Submit a copy of the approved federal Form 2350, Application for Extension of Time to File U.S. Income Tax Return, by attaching it to the front of your Form CT‑1040.

 

Extension of Time to Pay

You may be eligible for a six-month extension of time to pay the tax due if you can show that paying the tax by the due date will cause undue hardship. You may request an extension by filing Form CT-1127, Application for Extension of Time for Payment of Income Tax, on or before the due date of the original return.

 

Attach Form CT-1127 to the front of Form CT-1040 or Form CT-1040 EXT and send it on or before the due date. As evidence of the need for extension, you must attach:

  • An explanation of why you cannot borrow money to pay the tax due;
  • A statement of your assets and liabilities; and

     

  • An itemized list of your receipts and disbursements for the preceding three months.

 

If an extension of time to pay is granted and you pay all the tax due in full by the end of the extension period, a penalty will not be imposed. However, interest will accrue on any unpaid tax from the original due date. You should make payments as soon as possible to reduce the interest you would otherwise owe.

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Estimated Tax Payments for Tax Year 2022

 

You must make estimated income tax payments if:

 

  1. Your Connecticut income tax, after taking into account your Connecticut tax withheld, and any Pass‑Through Entity Tax Credit (PE Tax Credit) you are allowed to claim, is $1,000 or more; and

     

  2. You expect your Connecticut income tax withheld (including any PE Tax Credit) to be less than your required annual payment for the 2022 taxable year.

 

Your required annual payment for the 2022 taxable year is the lesser of:

 

  • 90% of the income tax shown on your 2022 Connecticut income tax return; or

     

  • 100% of the income tax shown on your 2021 Connecticut income tax return, if you filed a 2021 Connecticut income tax return that covered a 12‑month period.

 

You do not have to make estimated income tax payments if:

 

  • You were a Connecticut resident during the 2021 taxable year, and you did not file a 2021 income tax return because you had no Connecticut income tax liability; or

     

  • You were a nonresident or part-year resident with Connecticut-sourced income during the 2021 taxable year and you did not file a 2021 income tax return because you had no Connecticut income tax liability.

 

If you were a nonresident or part-year resident and you did not have Connecticut-sourced income during the 2021 taxable year, your required annual payment is 90% of the income tax shown on your 2022 Connecticut income tax return.

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Annualized Income Installment Method

 

If your income varies throughout the year, you may be able to reduce or eliminate the amount of your estimated tax payment for one or more periods by using the annualized income installment method. See Informational Publication 2018(11), A Guide to Calculating Your Annualized Estimated Income Tax Installments and Worksheet CT1040 AES.

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Filing Form CT-1040ES

 

You may file and pay your 2022 Connecticut estimated tax using the TSC. You may also make your payments by credit card. Visit the DRS website at portal.ct.gov/TSC for more information.

 

Use Form CT1040ES, Estimated Connecticut Income Tax Payment Coupon for Individuals, to make estimated Connecticut income tax payments for 2022 by mail. If you made estimated tax payments by mail in 2021, you will automatically receive coupons for the 2022 taxable year in mid‑January. They will be preprinted with your name, address, and the last four digits of the SSN. To ensure your payments are properly credited, use the preprinted coupons.

 

If you did not make estimated tax payments in 2021, use Form CT‑1040ES to make your first estimated income tax payment. If you file this form, additional preprinted coupons will be mailed to you. Form CT‑1040ES is available on the DRS website at portal.ct.gov/DRSIf you fille this form, additional preprinted coupons will be mailed to you.

 

To avoid making estimated tax payments, you may request that your employer or payer withhold additional amounts from your wages, pension, or annuity to cover the taxes on other income. You can make this change by

giving your employer or payer a revised Form CTW4, Employee’s Withholding Certificate or Form CTW4P, Withholding Certificate for Pension or Annuity Payments. For help in determining the correct amount of Connecticut withholding be withheld from your income, see Informational Publication 2022(7), Is My Connecticut Withholding Correct?

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Special Rules for Farmers and Fishermen

 

If you are a farmer or fisherman (as defined in IRC § 6654(i)(2)) who is required to make estimated income tax payments, you must make only one payment. Your payment is due on or before January 15, 2023, for the 2022 taxable year. The required installment is the lesser of 66 2/3% of the income tax shown on your 2022 Connecticut income tax return or 100% of the income tax shown on your 2021 Connecticut income tax return.

 

If you file a 2022 Connecticut income tax return on or before March 1, 2023, and pay in full the amount computed on the return as payable on or before that date, you will not be charged interest for underpayment of estimated tax.

 

Farmers or fishermen who use these special rules must complete and attach Form CT2210, Underpayment of Estimated Tax by Individuals, Trusts, and Estates, to their Connecticut income tax return to avoid being billed for interest on the underpayment of estimated income tax. Check Box D of Form CT‑2210, Part 1, and the box for Form CT‑2210 on the front of Form CT‑1040. See Informational Publication 2021(2), Farmer’s Guide to Sales and Use Taxes, Motor Vehicle Fuels Tax, Estimated Income Tax, and Withholding Tax, or Informational Publication 2021(4), Commercial Fisherman’s Guide to Sales and Use Taxes and Estimated Income Tax.

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Filing Form CT-2210

 

Use Form CT‑2210 to calculate interest on the underpayment of estimated tax. Form CT‑2210 and detailed instructions are available from DRS. However, this is a complex form and you may prefer to have DRS calculate the interest. If so, do not file Form CT‑2210 and DRS will send you a bill.

 

Interest on Underpayment of Estimated Tax               

You may be charged interest if you did not pay enough tax through withholding or estimated payments, or both, by any installment due date, or if any PE Tax Credit reported to you on Schedule CT K‑1, Part 3, Line 1, or Schedule CT‑1041 K‑1, Part 4, Line 1, is not sufficient to cover your tax liability by the installment due date. This is true even if you are due a refund when you file your tax return. Interest is calculated separately for each installment. Therefore, you may owe interest for an earlier installment even if you paid enough tax later to make up the underpayment. Interest at 1% per month or fraction of a month will be added to the tax due until the earlier of April 15, 2022, or the date on which the underpayment is paid.

 

If you file a 2021 Connecticut income tax return on or before January 31, 2022, and pay in full the amount computed on the return as payable on or before that date, you will not be charged interest for failing to make the estimated payment due January 15, 2022.

 

Farmers or fishermen: see Special Rules for Farmers and Fishermen

 

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Interest and Penalties

 

In general, interest and penalty apply to any portion of the tax not paid on or before the original due date of the return.

 

If you do not pay the tax when due, you will owe interest at 1% per month or fraction of a month until the tax is paid in full.

 

Interest on underpayment or late payment of tax cannot be waived.

 

Penalty for Late Payment or Late Filing

The penalty for late payment or underpayment of income or use tax is 10% of the tax due. If a request for an extension of time to file has been granted, you can avoid a penalty for failure to pay the full amount due by the original due date if you:

 

  • Pay at least 90% of the income tax shown to be due on the return on or before the original due date of the return; and

     

  • Pay the balance due with the return on or before the extended due date. If you file your return electronically and pay your balance due by check, then your check must be postmarked on whichever is earlier: the date of acceptance of the electronic return or the extended due date.

 

If no tax is due, DRS may impose a $50 penalty for the late filing of any return or report that is required by law to be filed.

 

Penalty for Failure to File 

If you do not file your return and DRS files a return for you, the penalty for failure to file is 10% of the balance due or $50, whichever is greater. If you are required to file Form CT1040X, Amended Connecticut Income Tax Return for Individuals, and fail to do so, a penalty may be imposed.

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Refund Information

 

There are two ways to get your refund: Direct Deposit or Paper Check.

 

The fastest way to get your refund is to file your return electronically and elect direct deposit. Paper return filers may request direct deposit. The direct deposit option is not available to first-time Connecticut income tax filers.

 

For faster service, DRS recommends that taxpayers use direct deposit to a savings or checking account.

 

For returns filed on paper, you must allow 10 to 12 weeks from the date you mailed the return before checking on the status of your refund.

 

Your refund could be delayed if additional information or identity verification is required to prevent refund theft.

 

Anyone who receives a refund but has not filed a Connecticut income tax return must contact DRS immediately. Call the DRS Fraud Unit at 855-842-1441.

 

Option 1: Direct Deposit

Make your direct deposit successful by:

  • Confirming your account number and routing number with your financial institution and entering the clearly on your tax return;

     

  • Entering the direct deposit information separately for both your federal and state electronically filed returns; and
  • Printing your software-prepared paper return only after you have entered the direct deposit information into the program.

 

Some financial institutions do not allow a joint refund to be deposited into an individual account.

                                                   

DRS reserves the right to send a paper check on any requested refund.

 

Option 2: Paper Check

If you do not elect direct deposit, or are a first time filer, a refund check will be issued and refund processing may be delayed.

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Payment Options

 

Electronically paying your taxes is easy, accurate, safe, and secure. It provides you with confirmation of receipt and reduces the possibility of errors, loss, or theft.

 

Pay Electronically 

To make a direct payment visit the TSC at portal.ct.gov/TSC and follow the prompts or visit https://drsindtax.ct.gov. You can authorize DRS to transfer funds from your bank account (checking or savings) to a DRS account by entering your bank account number and your bank routing number.

 

You can file your return any time before the due date and designate the amount of payment and date of transfer. Your bank account will be debited on the date you indicate. You must pay the balance due on or before the due date to avoid penalty and interest.

 

If you elect to file your return electronically but make your payment of tax due with a paper check, you are required to remit your payment with Form CT1040V, 2021 Connecticut Electronic Filing Payment Voucher. Do not send a paper copy of your electronically filed return with the payment.

 

 

Pay by Credit Card or Debit Card

 

   

You may elect to pay your 2021 Connecticut income tax liability using a credit card (American Express®, Discover®, MasterCard®, VISA®) or comparable debit card. Visit ACI Payments, Inc. at www.acipayonline.com and select State Payments. You will be informed of the amount of the fee and may elect to cancel the transaction. Your payment will be effective on the date that you make the charge. At the end of the transaction, you will receive a confirmation number for your records.