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Morning-glory (Ipomoea)

Plant Health Problems
This plant has no major disease problems in the Connecticut landscape.

Insect Problems:

Aphids, Aphis gossypii.
The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii can infest morning glory. Among the compounds registered for control of this pest in Connecticut are acephate, insecticidal soap, or soil-applied imidacloprid. Consult the labels for dosage rates and safety precautions.

Leafminer, Bedellia somnulentella.
The larva of this small moth makes a serpentine mine in the leaves, sometimes involving a large proportion of the leaf tissue. When mature, it emerges from the mine, transforms, and suspends its slender angular cocoon from the leaf by a few silk threads. In a few days, the small gray moth emerges. Among the compounds registered for control of this pest in Connecticut are acephate sprayed on the foliage and imidacloprid applied as a systemic to be taken up by the roots. Consult the labels for dosage rates and safety precautions.

Morning-glory leafcutter, Loxostege obliteralis.
This insect cuts the leaf stalks, causing the leaves to wilt. The greenish caterpillars hide during the day and feed only at night. Holes may also be eaten in the leaves at this time. The moths are yellowish with some light brown markings. Among the compounds registered for control of the larvae of this pest in Connecticut are acephate, spinosad, Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki, carbaryl, or malathion. Consult the labels for dosage rates and safety precautions.

Spotted cucumber beetle, Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi.
This is a minor pest that occasionally causes injury. It is somewhat larger than the striped cucumber beetle, and the wing covers are greenish yellow marked with 12 black spots varying in size and arranged in three transverse rows. The life history and control is similar to that of the striped beetle. See Cucumber Beetle fact sheet .

Picture of Tortoise BeetleTortoise beetles.
The leaves of Convolvulus and Ipomoea are sometimes eaten by tortoise beetles. Usually, control measures are unnecessary, but in case severe injury is feared, acephate, carbaryl, spinosad or malathion are among the compounds registered for use against this pest in Connecticut and may be applied to protect the foliage. Imidacloprid may also provide control when applied as a systemic. Consult the labels for dosage rates and safety precautions.