Morey Pond, Ashford

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2005 Aquatic Plant Survey Map of Morey Pond

(1.5 MB, .pdf format*)

Transect Data (249 KB, .pdf format*)  | Water Data

   Morey Pond is a body of water divided in two by I-84.  The northern section is 16.3 acres and the southern section is 28.5 acres.  There is no residential development along the shoreline. The Nipmuck State Forest and the highway surround the north basin and highways and woodland and agricultural land surround the south basin.  There is a boat launch on the northern shore of the north basin. Access from one basin to another is via a small navigable culvert.  The pond has a maximum depth of 11 feet (3.5 m) and a mean depth of 6.7 feet (2 m).

   Our vegetation survey in August 2005 revealed an unidentified sedge to be the most widespread plant.  The sedge was mostly found in the north basin where it covered the bottom throughout this area.  Nymphaea odorata and Utricularia purpurea also were abundant in the north basin.  N. odorata was the dominant species in two coves, one in the north and other on the west side, and also occurred in a small patch on the west side.  Utricularia purpurea was found on all sides of the north basin and as large scattered patches in the middle of the north basin.  To a lesser extent, Eriocaulon aquaticum, Potamogeton bicupulatus, Potamogeton natans and Sparganium sp. also were found on all sides of the north basin.

   Other species were not found on every side of the north basin and occurred in much smaller patches.  Utricularia vulgaris was found in the middle and on the north, south and west sides of the north basin.  Juncus pelocarpus and Utricularia gibba were found on the west and east sides, and Utricularia radiata was found on the north and east sides of the north basin.  Brasenia schreberi, Nuphar variegata and Proserpinaca palustris were found only on the north side, and Charaphyte was only found on the south side of the north basin.  Elodea nuttallii and Najas flexilis were only found on the west side, and Gratiola aurea was only found on the east side of the north basin.

   Vegetation in the south basin was limited to the shoreline at depths less than 6 feet (2 m).  Eleocharis acicularis was the most abundant species in the south basin, occurring on all sides.  Eriocaulon aquaticum, Potamogeton bicupulatus, Myriophyllum humile, Gratiola aurea, Potamogeton epihydrus and Utricularia purpurea also occurred on all sides of the south basin. 

   Other species were not found on every side of the south basin.  Sparganium sp. occurred on the north, west and east sides of the basin.  Utricularia radiata was found on the north and south sides, and Juncus pelocarpus and Utricularia vulgaris were found on the north and west sides of the basin.  Charaphyte was found on the west and east sides of the south basin.  Nuphar variegata only occurred on the north side of the basin.  Elatine minima, Utricularia gibba and an unidentified sedge were found only on the west side, while Isoëtes echinospora and Potamogeton pusillus were only found on the east side of the south basin.

Find Common Plant Names

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Species recorded in our 2005 survey of Morey Pond. Click on plant to view herbarium mount. (invasive species in bold)
Charaphyte
Eleocharis acicularis
Gratiola aurea
Isoëtes echinospora
Sparganium sp.
Unidentified sedge
Utricularia gibba
Utricularia vulgaris


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