Connecticut COVID-19 Response

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COVID-19 VACCINES >> Due to high traffic volume at websites and phone lines, eligible residents in Phase 1B may encounter delays scheduling appointments to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Please try back later. Appointment availability is limited but we will continue to open up slots as they become available.

Frequently Asked Questions about the COVID-19 Vaccination

If you have questions about who is in which phase, and how to access a COVID-19 vaccination, you may visit ct.gov/covidvaccine/access. Employers may visit ct.gov/covidvaccine/employers.
Eligibility, and Requirements

When will I be able to receive a COVID-19 Vaccine? 
Information about eligibility and timeline can be found at ct.gov/covidvaccine/access.

Who is and isn’t in Phase 1a, and Phase 1b? 
Information about who falls into each phase of the vaccine at this time can be found at ct.gov/covidvaccine/access. It’s important to remember that vaccination access and information changes quickly, so please check back frequently for the most up-to-date information. 

Is the COVID-19 vaccine mandatory? 
No.  The State of Connecticut is not mandating vaccination.  

Scheduling your Vaccination During Phase 1b

For those looking for more information about 75+ scheduling, visit our dedicated page: 
Scheduling and Details for 75+

If I’m not 75 and over, but I’m eligible for vaccine in Phase 1b, can I schedule my vaccine appointment?
Scheduling is currently available for those 75 and older. Certain frontline workers, like first responders and teachers, may be receiving vaccine through their employers. However, unless you have received a call from your employer that you can now schedule your appointments, you must wait.

Can I sign my parents/grandparents up for an appointment via the online scheduler?
Yes, you can.  However, each person you are signing up must have their own, distinct email address.

Should I call my doctor to schedule a vaccine appointment?
No, do not call your doctor. Not every medical provider is administering vaccine at this time. Those who are will contact their patients to schedule appointments. 

If I’m under the age of 75 and I have documented underlying health conditions can I schedule my appointment now?
No. Currently only individuals 75 and over are being scheduled for appointments. We anticipate that Phase 1b will open up to additional individuals in the weeks to come, particularly as our vaccine supply from the federal government increases.

I’m a worker eligible for Phase 1b, but I work for myself and don’t have an employer.  How do I get my vaccine?
Right now we are only scheduling individuals who are 75 and over.  An announcement will be made when other Phase 1b individuals can make their vaccine appointments. 

I am in Phase 1a, but wasn’t able to get my vaccination yet, do I have to wait now?
No, individuals who were eligible in Phase 1a can still be vaccinated, along with individuals 75 and over. If you lack the internet access to make your appointment you can call the COVID 19 Vaccine Appointments Assistance Line.

Privacy

If I get a vaccination, where will my information go? Can I be sure it will be kept safe?

Your personal and health care information will be kept private, and will not be shared outside of your healthcare provider's office, and the Department of Public Health. Personal identifying information such as your name, contact information, and address will be treated as confidential health care information and will not be shared with law enforcement or the federal government without a court order or similar legal compulsion.  

Getting the Vaccine

Where do I go for a vaccination? 

When you are eligible for a vaccination, you will most likely work through your medical provider, or the employer coordinator at your workplace to learn about the specifics of your eligibility requirements. Vaccines will be able to be administered in a wide range of places: physician’s offices, hospitals, pharmacies, community health centers, and other locations that would normally administer vaccinations.  

I don't have state-issued identification, will I be able to get a COVID-19 vaccination?

Yes. A state-issued ID is not required to get a vaccination in the State of Connecticut, and is not a prerequisite for eligibility. No person will be turned away based on their ability to show ID. While sharing your contact information may not be required to get a vaccine, your provider will likely ask for it in order to make sure you are able to come back for your second dose, so we recommend sharing it with your provider. 

Am I going to be required to carry verification that I’ve been vaccinated? 
No. Although your provider will make sure that their records reflect you have received vaccine in order to most effectively treat you in the future.  

The Roll Out in Connecticut

How much vaccine is CT getting? 

Vaccination amounts are being allocated on a per capita basis by the federal government, and updates about numbers will be released on an on-going basis.  

What is the timeline for the state to make vaccine available to more residents?

Vaccines will start to become available quickly after the required Emergency Use Authorizations (EUAs) are in place. We are currently in Phase 1a, and expect Phase 1b to begin soon, depending upon the supply of vaccine. There may be some overlap between phases as new populations are made eligible even as groups in the first phase continue to receive vaccination.

Employers

I have staff that I believe qualify as healthcare and critical workforce, how do I get them vaccinated? 
Information about how to ensure your staff are vaccine can be found at ct.gov/covidvaccine/employers

The Vaccine

Is there a difference between the vaccinations that I can take? 
There are only small differences, but both vaccines currently authorized by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are highly effective based on trials. Below, you’ll see some basic details about both.  

Vaccine Age Requirements Recommended Time Between Doses 
Pfizer  16+ 21 days
Moderna  18+ 28 days

Do I get to choose which vaccine brand I want to receive? 
In general, given scarce supply, only one vaccine may be available through your provider. You can talk with your medical provider if you have specific questions or concerns that may lead you to want to seek out one specific COVID-19 vaccine versus another.  

The Second Dose

How do I know when to schedule my second vaccination? 
Most providers will ask you to schedule your first and second vaccination at the same time, and will help you set up reminders via text, email, or phone call about your second dose.  

What if I miss my second shot? 
You should talk to your provider about what next steps you need to take if you miss an appointment for your second vaccination. You will likely be able to get your second vaccination within a short time period of the recommended date, and it will remain effective.  

Vaccination Trials

Can people who have already have COVID-19 get the vaccine? 
Yes.  The CDC recommends that you get vaccinated even if you have already had COVID-19 because you can catch it more than once.  While you may have some short-term antibody protection after recovering from COVID-19, we don’t know how long this protection will last. 

How do we know the vaccines are safe? 
The Pfizer vaccine alone had a trial of over 40,000 people over a period of many months without any serious incidents. No vaccines will be available to the public without the review of the federal government and the Science Subcommittee of Governor Lamont’s Vaccine Advisory Group. In Connecticut, we continue to make every decision with public health as a number one priority.  

Since the vaccine is so new, how do you know there won’t be long term health effects from taking it? 
Because all COVID-19 vaccines are new, it will take more time and more people getting vaccinates to learn about very rare or possible long-term effects.  At least 8 weeks’ worth of safety data were gathered in the clinical trials for all the authorized vaccines and it’s unusual for vaccine side effects to appear more than 8 weeks after vaccination. 

Long-Term Care Facilities 

My relative is in a nursing home, can I visit once the residents are vaccinated? 
You should continue to follow guidelines released by the Department of Public Health. While you or your family member may be vaccinated, you may come into others who are not, so it is critical to continue to use caution. 

If I’m vaccinated, can I visit family in the hospital or nursing home? 
You should continue to follow guidelines released by the Department of Public Health. While you or your family member may be vaccinated, you may come into others who are not, so it is critical to continue to use caution. 

Once I’m vaccinated, can I stop wearing a mask and social distancing? 
No. Not everyone you come into contact with will have received the vaccine, and you may still be able to spread COVID-19. It is critical to follow basic public health best practices for the foreseeable future. 

Risk of Infection, and Safety

Can I still get COVID-19 after I’m vaccinated? 
It typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity after vaccination. That means it’s possible you could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and get sick. However, if you still get infected after you get vaccinated, the vaccine may prevent serious illness.

What are the side effects of the vaccine? 
Those who receive the vaccine may experience mild symptoms of COVID-19 and soreness at the site of injection. Information about rare allergic reactions to the vaccination can be found on the CDC website

Is it safe to get vaccinated if I have an underlying health condition? 
Yes. COVID-19 vaccination is especially important for people with underlying health problems like heart disease, lung disease, diabetes, and obesity.  People with these conditions are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19. It is recommended that people with these conditions get vaccinated. Individuals who have had prior allergic reactions to injectable medicines should consult with their medical providers before receiving a COVID-19 vaccine.  

I’ve had allergic reactions to other shots, can I get the COVID-19 vaccine? 
You should talk with your provider about what allergies may make it risky for you to get the COVID-19 vaccination, but, it has proven safe in the vast majority of instances.  

Can I get the vaccine if I’m pregnant or nursing? 
Yes. 

Is the COVID-19 vaccination safe for children?
Vaccinations are only authorized for those over 16 at this time, and more research needs to be done to develop a vaccine for children, but we are hopeful that there will be an update in the future.

Can people who have already have COVID-19 get the vaccine? 
Yes. The CDC recommends that you get vaccinated even if you have already had COVID-19 because you can catch it more than once. While you may have some short-term antibody protection after recovering from COVID-19, we don’t know how long this protection will last. 

How do we know the vaccines are safe? 
The Pfizer vaccine alone had a trial of over 40,000 people over a period of many months without any serious incidents. No vaccines will be available to the public without the review of the federal government and the Science Subcommittee of Governor Lamont’s Vaccine Advisory Group. In Connecticut, we continue to make every decision with public health as a number one priority.  

Can the vaccine give me COVID-19? 
No.  None of the COVD-19 vaccines currently authorized for use or in development in the United States use the live virus that causes COVID-19. However, it typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity after vaccination. That means it’s possible you could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and get sick. 

Does this vaccine cause infertility? 
No. This is a rumor. 

I have a food allergy, can I get the vaccine? 
Yes. Information about the COVID-19 vaccination and allergies can be found on the CDC's website.

I have seasonal allergies, can I get the vaccine? 
Yes. Information about the COVID-19 vaccination and allergies can be found on the CDC's website.

Can the vaccine give me COVID-19? 
No. None of the COVID-19 vaccines currently authorized for use or in development in the United States use the live virus that causes COVID-19.  However, it typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity after vaccination. That means it’s possible you could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and get sick.

 
 
 

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