CJTS Closure Plan
E-mail your questions and recommendations: HERE
Framework for the Plan to Close CJTS
Key Activities
Plan Development Process:

Summary

Timeline for developing the plan

 

 

The Department of Children and Families (DCF) will develop recommendations for changes in the juvenile justice system that would be required to close or modify the Connecticut Juvenile Training School (CJTS) by July 1, 2018, a goal set by Governor Dannel P. Malloy. DCF will work in conjunction with members of JJPOC to develop these recommendations for the Governor. 

 

The plan should provide for the best interests of the youth currently at CJTS or who in the future would be served there if the age of youth in the juvenile justice system is raised once again.  The plan will be informed by national best practices, as well as an analysis of the population of youth currently served by CJTS and the youth who will be impacted by future age-related statutory changes.  The Department will present options for closure, including the development of new services and the re-purposing of existing programs to meet the needs of the population.

 

The plan’s development will be led by Department Deputy Commissioner Fernando Muñiz, who prior to coming to the agency in 2005 was the executive director of the Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance. The plan will propose alternatives to CJTS, including secure and non-secure congregate settings and community-based alternatives to incarceration.

 

Members of the JJPOC will serve in an advisory role in the development of the plan to close CJTS.

 

One of the first tasks will be analyzing data from the Judicial Branch and the Department to estimate the future needs of the youth currently served at CJTS as well as those youth who will be affected by future age-related statutory changes.

 

A diverse group of national experts and state stakeholders will be consulted in the preparation of the plan.  In addition to external input, the Department also will seek input from CJTS staff and juvenile justice social workers in the DCF area offices.

 

The plan will include recommendations for alternatives to incarceration for youth whose offense history and risk level do not warrant a secure setting.  Finally, congregate care alternatives to CJTS also will be presented, including, but not limited to, building new, smaller secure regional treatment centers and re-purposing surplus state property.

 

All stakeholders are welcome to submit their recommendations on the closure and on what services are needed in communities to serve this population of youth by sending an e-mail to CJTSPlan@ct.gov

 

Please check back on this page for updates and for the schedule of community meetings that will inform the development of the plan.

The Department of Children and Families will develop recommendations for the implementation of any changes in the juvenile justice system that would be required in order to close or modify the Connecticut Juvenile Training School by July 1, 2018 in a manner that accounts for the best interests of the youth currently or in the future would otherwise be served by such school.  The plan will be informed by national best practices, as well as an analysis of the population of youth currently served by CJTS and the youth who will be impacted by future age related statutory changes. JJPOC will serve as in an advisory and oversight role during the planning process. We will present options for closure, including the development of new services and the re-purposing of existing programs to meet the needs of the population.

 

Key Activities

  1. Analyze data to estimate the future needs of the youth currently served at CJTS as well as those youth who will be impacted by future age related statutory changes.
  2. Solicit input from content experts and key stakeholders.
  3. Propose alternatives to CJTS, including secure and non-secure congregate settings and community-based alternatives to incarceration.

Plan Development Process:


Phase I: Developing the foundation

  1. Existing data from the Judicial Branch and DCF will be analyzed to estimate the future needs of the population, including the projected need for secure confinement.
  2. We will consult with national experts on juvenile justice and juvenile corrections, including the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Georgetown University Center for Juvenile Justice Reform and the Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators.
 
  1. We will solicit input from external stakeholders, including the LISTs, DCF advisory councils and parent advocacy groups.

  2. We will work collectively with members of the JJPOC to solicit input and obtain advice for the purposes of developing a plan

  3. We will consult with other agencies in the juvenile justice system, including the Court Support Services Division, the Department of Correction and the Police Chiefs Association.

  4. In addition to external input, we will also seek the input of CJTS staff and juvenile justice social workers in the DCF area office


Phase III: Plan Development

  1. The plan will include recommendations for alternatives to incarceration for youth whose offense history and risk level do not warrant a secure setting.
  2. Congregate care alternatives to CJTS will also be presented, including but not limited to:
      1. Building new, smaller secure regional treatment centers;
      2. Re-purposing surplus state property.